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CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response: What''s New

An RSS feed of new postings to the Emergency Preparedness and Response website.
CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response: What's New
  1. Public Health Matters Blog - Norovirus Illness is Messy – Clean Up Right Away
    When norovirus strikes in your own home, you can be prepared by having the supplies you need to immediately clean up after a loved one vomits or has diarrhea. Norovirus is a tiny germ that spreads quickly and easily. It causes vomiting and diarrhea that come on suddenly. A very small amount of norovirus can make you sick. The number of virus particles that fit on the head of a pin is enough to infect over 1,000 people.
  2. Public Health Matters Blog - Rural America in Crisis: The Changing Opioid Overdose Epidemic
    In America, 15 out of 100 people live in a rural area. I loved growing up in a rural community, where there were actually no stop lights, everyone knew their neighbors, and doors were always open. But, my years of working in public health has taught me rural areas are not that different from urban areas when it comes to the devastating impact of the opioid epidemic. The rate of drug overdose deaths in rural areas has surpassed rates in urban areas, and it is a huge public health concern. Understanding how rural areas are different when it comes to drug use and drug overdose deaths, including opioids, can help public health professionals identify, monitor, and prioritize their response to this epidemic.
  3. Public Health Matters Blog - ABCs of Viral Hepatitis
    Viral hepatitis is the term that describes inflammation of the liver that is caused by a virus. There are actually five types of hepatitis viruses; each one is named after a letter in the alphabet: A, B, C, D and E. The most common types of viral hepatitis are A, B and C. These three viruses affect millions of people worldwide, causing both short-term illness and long-term liver disease. The World Health Organization estimates 325 million people worldwide are living with chronic hepatitis B or chronic hepatitis C. In 2015, 1.34 million died from viral hepatitis, a number that is almost equal to the number of deaths caused by tuberculosis and HIV combined.
  4. Public Health Matters Blog - Preparing to quit: 10 tips to help you quit smoking
    Each year, on the third Thursday of November, the American Cancer Society encourages smokers to quit during the Great American Smokeout. Most people who smoke want to quit, but they also know quitting is hard…it can take several attempts to succeed.
  5. Public Health Matters Blog - Everyone can be a flu vaccine advocate!
    With the holidays quickly approaching, there will be more opportunities to spend time with family and friends. Now is the time to ensure that you and those around you are protected from flu. Now is the time to get your seasonal flu vaccine if you haven’t already gotten it. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies that protect against flu to develop in the body.—so it’s important to get vaccinated now, before the flu begins circulating in your community.
  6. Public Health Matters Blog - Loving Someone With Epilepsy
    When Zayan first told me that he has epilepsy, I didn’t believe him. “You mean seizures, right?” I was embarrassed at how much I didn’t know. Epilepsy is a disorder of the brain that triggers recurrent seizures. It can be caused by different conditions that affect a person’s brain. A person is diagnosed with epilepsy when they have had two or more seizures that are not caused by another medical condition such as a high fever or low blood sugar.
  7. Public Health Matters Blog - Partner, Train, Respond: Increasing Global Emergency Management Capacity
    Countries in Africa are no strangers to major disease outbreaks that can result in illness and death of millions of people. In the past two years alone the continent has experienced infectious disease outbreaks of cholera, meningitis, Ebola Virus Disease, Lassa fever, and Yellow fever, and other public health emergencies such as drought and famine.
  8. Public Health Matters Blog - Halloween Rules of the Road
    Halloween is an exciting time for kids and adults – the delight of dressing up in a fun costume, all of the spooky decorations, and of course let’s not forget the candy. Traditionally, kids trick-or-treat at night – going house-to-house in their costumes. On average, children are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car and killed on Halloween than on any other day of the year. Children are at Trick-or-Treat Checklist: first aid kit, warm clothes, water, cell phone, emergency contact card, trick-or-treat route, reflective strips or tape, well-fitting costume, comfy shoes, flashlight or glow sticks, trick-or-treat baggreater risk of injury than adults because they are small, have trouble judging distances and speeds, and have little to no experience with traffic rules.
  9. New: Health Alert Network (HAN) No. 408 - Advice for Providers Treating Patients in or Recently Returned from Hurricane-Affected Areas, Including Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is working with federal, state, territorial, and local agencies and global health partners in response to recent hurricanes. CDC is aware of media reports and anecdotal accounts of various infectious diseases in hurricane-affected areas, including Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands (USVI). Because of compromised drinking water and decreased access to safe water, food, and shelter, the conditions for outbreaks of infectious diseases exist. The purpose of this HAN advisory is to remind clinicians assessing patients currently in or recently returned from hurricane-affected areas to be vigilant in looking for certain infectious diseases, including leptospirosis, dengue, hepatitis A, typhoid fever, vibriosis, and influenza. Additionally, this Advisory provides guidance to state and territorial health departments on enhanced disease reporting.
  10. New: Health Alert Network (HAN) No. 407 - Rifampin/Penicillin-Resistant Strain of RB51 Brucella Contracted from Consumption of Raw Milk
    The Texas Department of State Health Services, with assistance from CDC, is investigating Brucella RB51 exposures and illnesses that may be connected to the purchase and consumption of raw (unpasteurized) milk from K-Bar Dairy in Paradise, Texas. Symptoms of brucellosis can include: fever, sweats, malaise, anorexia, headache, fatigue, muscle & joint pain, and potentially more serious complications (e.g., swelling of heart, liver, or spleen, neurologic symptoms).
  11. New: Health Alert Network (HAN) No. 406 - Hurricane Harvey—Clinical Guidance for Carbon
    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless, poisonous gas that can cause sudden illness and death if present in sufficient concentration in the ambient air. During a significant power outage, persons using alternative fuel or power sources such as generators or gasoline powered engine tools such as pressure washers might be exposed to toxic CO levels if the fuel or power sources are placed inside or too close to the exterior of the building causing CO to build up in the structure. The purpose of this HAN advisory is to remind clinicians evaluating persons affected by the storm to maintain a high index of suspicion for CO poisoning.
  12. Public Health Matters Blog - Empowering Kids to Make Their Families Safer
    After graduating from college I moved to Anchorage, Alaska for a year of post-graduate service through the Jesuit Volunteer Corps NW and AmeriCorps. I served as the Preparedness and Casework Specialist for the American Red Cross of Alaska. Though often overlooked, Alaska is the largest state in the country (more than twice as big as Texas!) and has more coastline than the rest of the United States combined. While a large portion of the population lives in Anchorage, dozens of Native Alaskan villages are scattered all across the state, often hundreds of miles apart.
  13. Public Health Matters Blog - Beat the Heat at DragonCon
    “This is a bad idea,” she said. “No, it’s cool. I have it all planned out,” I replied. “Yeah, I’m not so sure about that but ok…” The topic was my costume. The problem was the weather; namely that it was 90° F degrees outside with 85% humidity, making it feel closer to 100 degrees. I was covered from head to toe in clothing that, while not heavy, did not promote airflow. My only exposed body parts were my face and one of my hands. Unfortunately, both were painted red and covered with two layers of barrier spray to prevent sweating and make the makeup water resistant. I’d worked hard on my Hellboy cosplay and DragonCon was the reward for my six weeks of work. “It’ll be fine. What’s the worst that can happen?” I said.
  14. Public Health Matters Blog - Safety Tips Every Contact Lens Wearer Should Know
    Are you one of the 45 million people in the United States who wear contact lenses to correct your vision? Eye infections related to improper contact lens wear and care are serious and can lead to long-lasting damage, but they are often preventable. Six out of seven adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 who wear contact lenses report at least one habit that increases their chances of an eye infection, including: • Not visiting an eye doctor at least once a year • Sleeping or napping while wearing contact lenses • Swimming while wearing contact lenses Parents of adolescents can model and encourage healthy contact lens wear and care habits so their children can develop and maintain healthy behaviors as young adults and adults. This year, in observance of Contact Lens Health Week, you can learn the science behind some of the important contact lens wear and care recommendations
  15. New: Health Alert Network (HAN) No. 405 - Increase in Reported cases of Cyclospora cayetanensis Infection, United States, Summer 2017
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), State and Local Health Departments, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating an increase in reported cases of cyclosporiasis. The purpose of this HAN Advisory is to notify public health departments and healthcare facilities and to provide guidance to healthcare providers of the increase in reported cases. Please disseminate this information to healthcare providers in hospitals and emergency rooms, to primary care providers, and to microbiology laboratories. Healthcare providers should consider a diagnosis of cyclosporiasis in patients with prolonged or remitting-relapsing diarrheal illness. Testing for Cyclospora is not routinely done in most U.S. laboratories, even when stool is tested for parasites. Healthcare providers must specifically order testing for Cyclospora, whether testing is requested by ova and parasite (O&P) examination, by molecular methods, or by a gastrointestinal pathogen panel test. Cyclosporiasis is a nationally notifiable disease; healthcare providers should report suspect and confirmed cases of infection to public health authorities.
  16. Public Health Matters Blog - Predicting community resilience and recovery after a disaster
    After 9/11, I was asked by the Baltimore City Health Commissioner to help prepare the city for a radiation terrorism event, because my entire career up until that point had been in radiation-based medical imaging. I didn’t know anything about public health preparedness at the time, but I found it very fulfilling to work with the city health department and other first responders, especially fire and police. Public health preparedness science and research is more than multi-disciplinary, it’s trans-disciplinary, which is what makes it fun.
  17. Public Health Matters Blog - You are what you eat…and so is your baby
    “As a mother of a baby born in 1973 when nobody was breastfeeding, I didn’t know why, but I instinctively knew breastfeeding was the best thing to do.” After my first son was born, I went back to school to become a nurse. During my interview I said, “I’m not interested in sick people, but I want to work with new moms and babies.” So, I worked in labor and delivery for 10 years. During my time on the labor and delivery floor I dedicated all of my free time to helping new mothers initiate breastfeeding. I realized this was my true passion, so I became a certified lactation consultant and have been helping mothers and babies ever since. Today, I want to share four things you might not know about breastfeeding.
  18. Public Health Matters Blog - Pediatrics and Public Health: Working Together to Prepare for Emergencies
    Did you know that one in four people in the United States are children? Children represent a considerable portion of our population and they are among our nation’s most vulnerable citizens. When a public health emergency or disaster strikes, children are often the most severely affected.
  19. Public Health Matters Blog - Step it up outdoors
    Physical activity can improve your health. People who are physically active tend to live longer and have lower risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers. Physical activity can also help with weight control, and may improve academic achievement in students. Walking is an easy way to start and maintain a physically active lifestyle, and parks are a great place to start.
  20. Public Health Matters Blog - Avoid Food Poisoning During Summer Picnics
    When I think about summer picnics, I think about family. I think about my cousins, aunts, uncles, kids running around, a pavilion, and an enormous buffet table loaded with delicious food. The quantity of side dishes and desserts is exceeded only by the number of dad jokes we’re forced to endure. Since I’ve been working with foodborne disease, I’ve made a point to share tips with family members who are preparing food so we can avoid getting sick from food poisoning.

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